a catharsis

On Grief and Reason, On Poetry and Film:
Elena Shvarts, Joseph Brodsky, Andrei Tarkovsky

The analysis on this article elucidates how grief impacted an individual and how reason becomes cheap and useless for those whose grief is so overwhelming. Truly so, only through empathy can we know what a person is going through. No one will understand others unless he/she goes through the same disaster. Until we suffer, we can never truly understand the sufferings of others. Until we fail, we can never truly understand the shame of others. Until we are frustrated, we can never truly understand the loneliness of others. Until we lose someone, we can never truly understand the grief of others.
Until we are rejected, we can never truly understand the bitterness of others. Until we are being judged and put down, we can never truly understand the dismay of others. Until we are betrayed, we can never truly understand the anger of others. Until we are attacked, we can never truly understand the fear of others. Until we are hurt, we can never truly understand the hurt of others. These are my realizations after 31 years of living on this earth. Hence, as the article articulates,
Is grief a process of mind that requires or
deforms logical, self-conscious thinking?
How much of the experience of loss and recovery
does any given poem face with lucid self-awareness?
In asking about the limits of what can be known
linguistically, might poems nonetheless seek
to explore the philosophical meanings of death?

This shows that it tries to explore the philosophical meanings of death and loss. Truly indeed, only where there is loss, can there be this gain and a worthy compensation it is. The universe operates on one basic truth which is balance….. When there is life, there is death and when there is gain, there is loss. Every disadvantage is an advantage when people have to realize that we can turn our problems into projects or crises into opportunities. Thus, it explains,

The title .“On Grief and Reason.” comes from
a lecture Joseph Brodsky delivered on the
American poet Robert Frost, whom he described
as terrifying, as distinct from tragic. The terror Brodsky
had in mind and the terror all people confront is
that of loss. Many theorists of the psyche tell us
that a sense of loss is a precondition to language
and to selfhood: only where there is loss can there
be this gain, and a mighty compensation it is.

In much the same way, it mirrors that a poet can really pour out the emotions when grief is heightened. It is something of a catharsis that words cannot express the true meaning of loss.

Much in the elegiac tradition affirms a sense of
self even as it explores the poet’s losses, and the
poet who comes to mourn is often one who
has found a new language for writing, as Peter Sacks,
writing in The English Elegy, has influentially shown.

Personally, elegies are kinds of poems that I love to read. I don’t know but I love reading poems which have themes on death and loss. They are real and sincere to me.
Particularly in post-nineteenth century poetry, however,
the element of self-creation can be more unstable
and bring little sense of consolation. Modern poems
often seem to go to the very edge of language’s
capacities to know. But the drama of loss and gain
remains at the center of such elegies, and
compensatory gestures abound even when they
do not satisfy.

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